This update has a very cool new feature: you can now see who else publicly shared the same URL, even if they’re…

This update has a very cool new feature: you can now see who else publicly shared the same URL, even if they’re outside your circle network. From the ripple page, you can enter any URL and see if anyone has shared it.

Here’s a huge one: https://plus.google.com/ripple/details?url=http://xkcd.com

Here’s a small one: https://plus.google.com/ripple/details?url=http://karaf.apache.org/

Update: it’s kind of sensitive, though. It doesn’t realize that “apple.com” and “http://apple.com” are the same URL.

Originally shared by Geoffrey Borggaard

Updates to Ripples: 60+ languages; see how links get shared

#googleplusupdate #ripples

Back in October, we launched ripples to help visualize how public posts get shared on Google+ (http://goo.gl/6qhVu). Today we’re rolling out two improvements that bring ripples to more people, and more types of content. Check out a new ripple (http://goo.gl/6se8K)!

1) Like the rest of Google+ (http://goo.gl/1eSl0), ripples are now available in over 60 languages. So whether you prefer Viwimbi, Strengir, or Jeka, you can now watch the content you care about flow across the network.

2) Ripples can now show you how links get shared, not just individual posts. Take +Sundar Pichai’s recent post about Chrome for Android, for example (http://goo.gl/u60O7):

– Before, ripples would only display activity around Sundar’s specific post.

– Today, because Sundar attached a link to his post, ripples displays all public shares of that URL, all across Google+.

– To use this new feature, simply “View ripples” on any publicly-shared post with a link attachment (see screenshot), or visit a ripples page, then type the URL you’re interested in.

As always, leave comments to let us know what you think!

Screenshots: