Did you see the XKCD comic where Randall describes the Saturn V rocket with only the 1000 most commonly used words…

Did you see the XKCD comic where Randall describes the Saturn V rocket with only the 1000 most commonly used words in English? (http://xkcd.com/1133/) Well, this browser-based text editor warns you when you use a word that’s not among those 1000. It’s fun trying to contort your sentences into something it accepts. #xkcd

Originally shared by Marcin Antkiewicz

Who can explain REST here?

http://splasho.nfshost.com/upgoer5/index.php

4 replies on “Did you see the XKCD comic where Randall describes the Saturn V rocket with only the 1000 most commonly used words…”

  1. ‘REST’ is short for ‘Representational’ ‘State’ ‘Transfer’.

    This is one way to make a computer work on the ‘Web’. The ‘Web’, you remember, means many many computers working together, bringing words and pictures and stuff like that from one computer to the other. A human might read the words and look at the pictures, but ‘REST’ for the most part is about how the computers talk to each other without a human wanting to look all the time. About ten years ago, when Mr. Fielding was in highest school, he watched how the ‘Web’ works and saw that ‘REST’ was in there all the time and he wrote it down.

    ‘REST’ has five or six parts.

    Part one is about the child computer and father computer (‘client’ and ‘server’). They talk to each other to bring words and pictures and stuff from the father computer to the child computer. Father computer and child computer have different jobs, so that the father computer can keep and remember all the words and pictures and stuff, but the child computer doesn’t need to. When the child computer doesn’t need to remember that much, then it becomes easily possible that there can be more child computers and the father computer talks to many child computers at once. Also, in the conversation between the computers, they always use the same words, maybe when the child computer says to the father computer to send a picture or something like that to the child computer. They have been using these same words since the ‘Web’ began. Now since they all talk the same, it becomes possible to make a father computer go away (perhaps it has a fault) and bring in a different father computer. The child computer won’t notice anything because the new father computer talks the same. The same thing holds true for the child computers.

    Part two is about remembering stuff (‘cache’). Sometimes words and pictures and stuff don’t go straight from a father computer to a child computer. Like you have a father’s father, and a father’s father’s father, the road of the ‘Web’ can go through several computers, and some have the job to remember stuff that comes along on the road. Let’s say the child computer wants a picture and thinks of asking the father’s father computer for it. It might happen that the father’s computer already has remembered the picture from earlier when a different child computer asked for that picture. So the father’s computer can send the picture much faster because the father’s father computer is further away.

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