Kosso K discovered that there’s a bug in the Data Liberation feature that omits older posts.

Kosso K discovered that there’s a bug in the Data Liberation feature that omits older posts. Hopefully the G+ team will fix it soon, because there’s no other way to get back to old posts that you haven’t permalinked.

Originally shared by Kosso

Data Liberation?

UPDATE: OK. I think I figured it out. August 2nd was the last date I backed my data. Therefore, when you do the backup it doesn’t back up ALL your data at the that time. It backs up the data since you last backed it up.

UPDATE 2: However, I am unable to re-download the old backups. They appear to ‘expire’ after 7 days. After that, you can no longer download the old backups.

UPDATE 3: Google are listening. Brian Fitzpatrick has kindly commented here on this post to say that the backups should NOT actually be incremental and that this is a bug which they are now looking in to. 🙂

So, I just did a backup here of all my content here, but (as Columbo would say) there’s just one thing that bothers me…

… in the zip file which I was able to download, the posts only go back to August 3rd. (Actually exactly 250 posts only)

I started creating, sharing and posting content here on June 30th.

This backup zip file does not contain all my data.

Discuss.

The About page of the “Ask a Mathematician / Ask a Physicist” site has a great FAQ answer that reads like a joke:

The About page of the “Ask a Mathematician / Ask a Physicist” site has a great FAQ answer that reads like a joke:

Q: how long on average does it take to answer an email?

Mathematician: Some questions we have been asked will never be answered. Hence, if the universe lasts forever, the average time to answer questions will inevitably be infinity.

Physicist: Usually a couple days.

http://www.askamathematician.com/about/

http://www.askamathematician.com/about/

I used to join mailing lists and accept committer access to open source projects with enthusiasm: I interpreted…

I used to join mailing lists and accept committer access to open source projects with enthusiasm: I interpreted invitations to join the community as a badge of respect. Now, I often find myself rejecting invitations. Two things have changed my opinion:

1) github, bugtrackers and the like – infrastructure-backed projects makes it so easy to make fire-and-forget contributions to a project that mailing lists and SVN commit rights seem onerous by contrast. I used to propose solutions to problems and have several iterations with project developers, but now I find myself submitting prototype patches along with bug reports and walking away. I still think that needing to create a Jira login for every project it annoying, but at least all of the apache.org projects share the same login

2) volume of projects – it seems each year we all use a larger number of third-party components to complete a project. A half-dozen external libraries seemed excessive a decade ago, but 150 or so small libraries is normal now. If you joined every project that you used, the information flood would lead to madness.

This seems both good and bad to me. It’s good that many projects have lowered their barrier to entry via either infrastructure or architecture. But it’s bad that projects may find it harder to grow a stable community (or maybe they don’t? I suppose it varies by project).

I attended the Forward Technology Conference today.

I attended the Forward Technology Conference today. It was interesting. I’m not an entrepreneur, but I attended to see who’s doing what in Madison. I greatly enjoyed the elevator pitch session where a handful of startups made their pitches and the audience asked questions and offered feedback. The keynote by Laurie Benson (former Inacom CEO) was excellent. And during the networking sessions I met a bunch of fascinating people that I wouldn’t have otherwise met.

This conference is a cool idea, especially for a tight-knit tech community like Madison’s.

http://www.ftf2011.com/

http://www.ftf2011.com/

I just realized that both of my MacBooks (work and home) are too old for Lion due to their Core Duo chips (Core 2…

I just realized that both of my MacBooks (work and home) are too old for Lion due to their Core Duo chips (Core 2 Duo is the minimum). I had been planning to upgrade them first before the iMac that I use the most for development. I haven’t yet decided if I care that much.

G+ added a nice feature last week where you don’t see multiple shares of the same item in your stream.

G+ added a nice feature last week where you don’t see multiple shares of the same item in your stream. But now I don’t see my own shares, nor comments under them. Some shares have interesting commentary attached and are worth seeing once. But I don’t have a happy medium to propose…

This is HARD!

This is HARD! Narrow a list of 100 best SF/Fantasy titles to your top 10. I am sad that Lions of Al-Rassan was not in the top 100 but Tigana is. Lions is much better than Tigana, but less famous.

Originally shared by David Brin

Vote in NPR’s poll of the best science fiction and fantasy novels! The 100 candidates include older works by Wells, Verne, Brunner, Dick, and Bester, as well as titles by Gaiman, Bear, Butler…plus my own Uplift Saga… and Earth.

http://www.npr.org/2011/08/02/138894873/vote-for-top-100-science-fiction-fantasy-titles